Sockeye Blog Archives

Want to know how Bill Sizemore is planning to trick Oregonians into voting for his anti-union ballot measure? We’ve posted a new video that reveals his strategy… in his own words. Click here to watch it.

Across the country, large corporations and the rich have waged attacks on public employees and middle-class families, taking away the voice of regular people. That fight is coming to Oregon, and it’s coming in the form of a ballot measure.

Sizemore is back with another attack on public employees and charities. He’s circulating an initiative that would revoke the right of public employees to contribute to their union’s political activities and many charities. His Initiative Petition 3 is nearly identical to Measure 64, which was defeated in 2008.

Before Sizemore was sent to jail for felony tax evasion, he revealed his campaign strategy—including a plan to trick and confuse voters—in a speech to a Tea Party group. Below is an edited version of his speech. (If you want to watch the full 43-minute speech, we've posted the link at the YouTube page.)

Want to know how Bill Sizemore is planning to trick Oregonians into voting for his anti-union ballot measure? We’ve posted a new video that reveals his strategy… in his own words. Click here to watch it.

Across the country, large corporations and the rich have waged attacks on public employees and middle-class families, taking away the voice of regular people. That fight is coming to Oregon, and it’s coming in the form of a ballot measure.

Sizemore is back with another attack on public employees and charities. He’s circulating an initiative that would revoke the right of public employees to contribute to their union’s political activities and many charities. His Initiative Petition 3 is nearly identical to Measure 64, which was defeated in 2008.

Before Sizemore was sent to jail for felony tax evasion, he revealed his campaign strategy—including a plan to trick and confuse voters—in a speech to a Tea Party group. Below is an edited version of his speech. (If you want to watch the full 43-minute speech, we've posted the link at the YouTube page.)

 

Corporate Lobbyists Join Sizemore’s Attack

Some of Oregon’s biggest corporate lobbyists also appear to be joining Sizemore’s attack on public employees, with a possible initiative of their own silencing the voice of working people. With the help of tobacco lobbyist Mark Nelson, they filed a similar initiative.

They’ve since withdrawn that initiative, but they could fund another effort, including financing from Sizemore-backer Loren Parks, a Nevada millionaire.

Eyes on the Street

Sizemore’s Initiative Petition 3 is currently on the streets gathering signatures. His organizations have used fraud, forgery, and racketeering in order to get on the ballot in the past. That’s why we need your eyes and ears on the street to help us gather information about Sizemore’s signature-gathering operation.

Have you spotted a signature gatherer on any initiative petitions? Go to defendoregon.org or email petitions@defendoregon.org and tell us what you saw. By helping us to collect this information, you’ll be an important part of this campaign.

It's Tuesday! Hope everyone had a good Labor Day weekend.

Bill Sizemore is back with another anti-union initiative petition, nearly identical to his Measure 64 from 2008. The Oregonian, reports, however, that it's circulating under someone else's name because of Sizemore's legal problems. The paper also takes a glimpse at the efforts by some of Oregon's corporate lobbyists to coordinate a similar initiative.

Economists report that thousands of layoffs of teachers and school employees--as many as 10,000 down from 2008 levels--are dragging down Oregon's economic recovery.

Meanwhile, the Democratic candidates for Oregon's CD1 congressional race all took the opportunity at yesterday's Labor Day Picnic to pledge to create more jobs.

It's Tuesday! Hope everyone had a good Labor Day weekend.

Bill Sizemore is back with another anti-union initiative petition, nearly identical to his Measure 64 from 2008. The Oregonian, reports, however, that it's circulating under someone else's name because of Sizemore's legal problems. The paper also takes a glimpse at the efforts by some of Oregon's corporate lobbyists to coordinate a similar initiative.

Economists report that thousands of layoffs of teachers and school employees--as many as 10,000 down from 2008 levels--are dragging down Oregon's economic recovery.

Meanwhile, the Democratic candidates for Oregon's CD1 congressional race all took the opportunity at yesterday's Labor Day Picnic to pledge to create more jobs.

This week's TBSL comes to you as a CHALLENGE.

If you give a man a fish, he'll eat for a day; if you teach a man to fish, he'll eat for life.
Well, let's go fishing!

This week, we challenge you, readers, to scope newspapers, websites, youtube, and more to find your own good news. Find something particularly uplifting? Check back here and share it -- and we'll post the best pieces in next week's TBSL.

Here are a few sites to get you started:

This week's TBSL comes to you as a CHALLENGE.

If you give a man a fish, he'll eat for a day; if you teach a man to fish, he'll eat for life.
Well, let's go fishing!

This week, we challenge you, readers, to scope newspapers, websites, youtube, and more to find your own good news. Find something particularly uplifting? Check back here and share it -- and we'll post the best pieces in next week's TBSL.

Here are a few sites to get you started:

http://www.facebook.com/positivelypositive
http://www.happynews.com/
http://happythings.tumblr.com/

It's Thursday! And the first day of September!

In national news, there's a new report showing 25 large corporations who paid their CEOs more than they paid in taxes. They also spent more on lobbying than they did on taxes.

Meanwhile, more than 200,000 public employees have been laid off around the country, leading to a further weakening of the economy (more unemployed people = less demand for goods and services). Oregon Business magazine details the large influence that corporate lobbyists and business associations had in drafting and driving the education bills in the last legislative session. And rallies are being held across the state this week during the congressional recess, with advocates pushing for "Jobs Not Cuts." There are two today: In Portland at Carousel Park at 5pm and in Bend at 5:30pm.

It's Thursday! And the first day of September!

In national news, there's a new report showing 25 large corporations who paid their CEOs more than they paid in taxes. They also spent more on lobbying than they did on taxes.

Meanwhile, more than 200,000 public employees have been laid off around the country, leading to a further weakening of the economy (more unemployed people = less demand for goods and services). Oregon Business magazine details the large influence that corporate lobbyists and business associations had in drafting and driving the education bills in the last legislative session. And rallies are being held across the state this week during the congressional recess, with advocates pushing for "Jobs Not Cuts." There are two today: In Portland at Carousel Park at 5pm and in Bend at 5:30pm.

"Guns don't kill people, the old saying goes. People do.

By the same token, corporations don't dodge taxes. People do. The people who run corporations. And these people — America's CEOs — are reaping awesomely lavish rewards for the tax dodging they have their corporations do."

Last year, 25 major US corporations spent more paying the salary of their CEOs than they did paying their entire federal income tax bill. The study, conducted by the Institute for Policy Studies, also discovered that these same companies also spent more on lobbying than taxes.

"Guns don't kill people, the old saying goes. People do.

By the same token, corporations don't dodge taxes. People do. The people who run corporations. And these people — America's CEOs — are reaping awesomely lavish rewards for the tax dodging they have their corporations do."

Last year, 25 major US corporations spent more paying the salary of their CEOs than they did paying their entire federal income tax bill. The study, conducted by the Institute for Policy Studies, also discovered that these same companies also spent more on lobbying than taxes.

The average annual salary for these corporate big shots? A whopping $16.7 million buckaroos.

The chief executive of Boeing, Jim McNerney, made $13.8 million last year, while his company paid only $13 million in taxes and spent $20.8 million on lobbying and campaign spending. eBay and General Electric were very similar.

How did this happen? Well, two-thirds of the companies used offshore subsidiaries in tax havens like Bermuda and Singapore. The rest got the good end of the stick of accelerated depreciation.

These CEOs are being rewarded for their ability to find ways to avoid paying the taxes that fund the schools, infrastructure, and public safety programs that allow them to be successful in the first place. That’s not only unfair and irresponsible, it’s also rewarding all the wrong behavior from a business perspective.

As one scholar in the report said, "I think it's an exposure of weakness in a company if their profitability is dependent on their accounting department and not on making better widgets."

Around the country, Wisconsin-style attacks on middle-class families and public employees are being waged by large corporations and the rich. These attacks are coming to Oregon in the form of a ballot measure, but today there is one less initiative petition aimed directly at Oregon workers.

Late yesterday, the chief petitioners of Initiative Petition 23 withdrew their petition. IP23 would have revoked the ability of public employees to contribute to their union’s political activities through their own paycheck—taking away a right that is available to every other worker in the state and giving large corporations even more political power.

“We’re pleased to learn that middle-class families and public employees won’t have to fight this specific measure—at least for now,” said Patrick Green, Executive Director of progressive group Our Oregon. “At a time when regular people are struggling just to make ends meet, the last thing we should do is give even more power to large corporations and the rich while taking away the voice of middle-class families.”

IP23 was coordinated by corporate lobbyist Mark Nelson. The signatures for the initiative were gathered by the signature-gathering firm started by Nelson, who is known to many Oregonians for running the opposition campaign to Measures 66 & 67 and for taking in $12 million in tobacco money to defeat a children’s healthcare measure.

While IP23 may be dead, initiative profiteer Bill Sizemore is still pushing forward with a similar initiative that would silence the political voice of public employees and many charities.

Around the country, Wisconsin-style attacks on middle-class families and public employees are being waged by large corporations and the rich. These attacks are coming to Oregon in the form of a ballot measure, but today there is one less initiative petition aimed directly at Oregon workers.

Late yesterday, the chief petitioners of Initiative Petition 23 withdrew their petition. IP23 would have revoked the ability of public employees to contribute to their union’s political activities through their own paycheck—taking away a right that is available to every other worker in the state and giving large corporations even more political power.

“We’re pleased to learn that middle-class families and public employees won’t have to fight this specific measure—at least for now,” said Patrick Green, Executive Director of progressive group Our Oregon. “At a time when regular people are struggling just to make ends meet, the last thing we should do is give even more power to large corporations and the rich while taking away the voice of middle-class families.”

IP23 was coordinated by corporate lobbyist Mark Nelson. The signatures for the initiative were gathered by the signature-gathering firm started by Nelson, who is known to many Oregonians for running the opposition campaign to Measures 66 & 67 and for taking in $12 million in tobacco money to defeat a children’s healthcare measure.

While IP23 may be dead, initiative profiteer Bill Sizemore is still pushing forward with a similar initiative that would silence the political voice of public employees and many charities.

It's Wednesday!

The Oregon Department of Revenue received positive feedback from a state audit, showing that they've increased collections efforts. Oregon AFL-CIO President Tom Chamberlain, who's not running for Portland mayor, files a guest opinion about the need for the next mayor to focus on jobs, and Steve Duin profiles a local business success.

Today is the last day to vote for Economic Fairness Oregon for the Excellence in Consumer Advocacy Award. The prize, given by Consumer Reports, includes $25,000 for the winning organization. Please vote to support Economic Fairness Oregon (EFO) here.

It's Wednesday!

The Oregon Department of Revenue received positive feedback from a state audit, showing that they've increased collections efforts. Oregon AFL-CIO President Tom Chamberlain, who's not running for Portland mayor, files a guest opinion about the need for the next mayor to focus on jobs, and Steve Duin profiles a local business success.

Today is the last day to vote for Economic Fairness Oregon for the Excellence in Consumer Advocacy Award. The prize, given by Consumer Reports, includes $25,000 for the winning organization. Please vote to support Economic Fairness Oregon (EFO) here.

This week Oregonians will be rallying in cities throughout the state, delivering a message of "Jobs, not cuts" to their congressional representatives who are in town making public appearances.

Can you join in? It's a great opportunity to share your story (and listen to others) and advocate for middle class Oregonians during these tough economic times.

Medford -- Wednesday, August 31

This week Oregonians will be rallying in cities throughout the state, delivering a message of "Jobs, not cuts" to their congressional representatives who are in town making public appearances.

Can you join in? It's a great opportunity to share your story (and listen to others) and advocate for middle class Oregonians during these tough economic times.

Medford -- Wednesday, August 31

Salem -- Wednesday, August 31

Bend --  Thursday, September 1

Portland -- Thursday, September 1

These events, in coordination with the Rebuild The Dream movement, are sponsored by: Oregon Action, Jobs With Justice, Alliance for Democracy, US Uncut, Rural Organizing Project, We Are Oregon, SEIU 503, SEIU 49, Moveon.org, AFSCME, PCUN,
Economic Fairness Oregon, Unite-Here Local 9, Our Oregon, Pride At Work and Basic Rights Oregon.

It's Tuesday!

Tobacco lobbyist Mark Nelson--who ran the Oregonians Against Job-Killing Taxes campaign against Measures 66 & 67--has set up a firm to gather signatures in order to get initiatives on the ballot. So far, the company has gathered signatures for a ban on real estate transfer fees and for Initiative 23, which would revoke the right of public employees to make contributions to their union's political activities through their paychecks. According to state records, they also gathered signatures for an initiative in Clackamas County, with money from Sizemore funder Loren Parks.

The Medford Mail Tribune offers advice to their readers: "The best protection against ill-advised or badly written initiatives is to keep them off the ballot by denying them enough signatures to qualify. When a signature gatherer asks for your signature, read the text of the measure and make sure you understand it before signing. If you're not sure exactly what the measure would do, don't sign the petition."

It's Tuesday!

Tobacco lobbyist Mark Nelson--who ran the Oregonians Against Job-Killing Taxes campaign against Measures 66 & 67--has set up a firm to gather signatures in order to get initiatives on the ballot. So far, the company has gathered signatures for a ban on real estate transfer fees and for Initiative 23, which would revoke the right of public employees to make contributions to their union's political activities through their paychecks. According to state records, they also gathered signatures for an initiative in Clackamas County, with money from Sizemore funder Loren Parks.

The Medford Mail Tribune offers advice to their readers: "The best protection against ill-advised or badly written initiatives is to keep them off the ballot by denying them enough signatures to qualify. When a signature gatherer asks for your signature, read the text of the measure and make sure you understand it before signing. If you're not sure exactly what the measure would do, don't sign the petition."

It's Monday! As reported on Friday, the new state economist released the quarterly revenue forecast for the state, predicting that the state will see $200 million less in revenues than was predicted three months ago. The blame is largely on the erratic stock market, although part of the reason for the downgrade is uncertainty with the national economy.

As the Oregon Center for Public Policy points out, the state will be forgoing about $134 million by letting Measure 66--which raised the marginal tax rate on household income above $250,000--expire.

Oregon AFL-CIO President Tom Chamberlain has decided against running for Portland mayor.

It's Monday! As reported on Friday, the new state economist released the quarterly revenue forecast for the state, predicting that the state will see $200 million less in revenues than was predicted three months ago. The blame is largely on the erratic stock market, although part of the reason for the downgrade is uncertainty with the national economy.

As the Oregon Center for Public Policy points out, the state will be forgoing about $134 million by letting Measure 66--which raised the marginal tax rate on household income above $250,000--expire.

Oregon AFL-CIO President Tom Chamberlain has decided against running for Portland mayor.