The corporate campaign by the numbers

Need more proof that the No on 97 campaign represents big corporate interests? We've got the numbers.

Tell your network:

Tell your network:

10_million_money_wave

This week, the campaign opposing Measure 97 passed $10 million in reported contributions, thanks to the help of some of the world’s largest corporations. It’s a milestone worth noting because the opposition has gone out of its way to pretend to be a campaign driven by small businesses and Oregonians, but the facts show that’s just not the case: The majority of the opposition’s money comes from the large, out-of-state corporations that would pay more taxes under Measure 97.

In fact, according to campaign finance reports, big and out-of-state corporations like Comcast and Wells Fargo represent more than $7 million of the $10 million in the opposition’s coffer.

It’s clear that No on 97 funders are a who’s who of big, corporate interests, and they’re willing to spend millions if that means avoiding paying their fair share for Oregon’s education, seniors, and health services. Don’t just take our word for it; follow the money to see who opposes corporate accountability:

$9.8 million comes from corporations and businesses.

56% of total contributions to the No campaign are from out-of-state companies.

$1.5 million comes from corporations that have defrauded customers, dodged taxes, and polluted or lobbied against our environment.

For good measure, here are the top 5 contributors to the opposition campaign:

$505,000: Lithia Motors, Inc.
$500,000: Albertsons-Safeway
$400,000: Cambia Health Solutions
$398,450: Standard Insurance
$315,000: Comcast Cable

It’s clear that large and out-of-state corporations will spend whatever it takes to make sure they can avoid paying their fair share here in Oregon — even if it means pouring millions of dollars more into the election.

We need your help to make sure that Oregon voters know who is backing the opposition to Measure 97 — large corporations that don’t want to pay their fair share. Click here to spread the word and help us hold large and out-of-state corporations accountable!

Print Friendly